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Nature best

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Tejasri Gururaj
Tejasri Gururaj enjoys music, science and nature. She likes to read books and draw Visit my Blog
Nature best
Piercing Gaze
Shine Like A Star
Magnificent
Staring
Thoughtful
Sky Is A Stage
Delicately Floating
Castle In The Air
Soaring high
Touch the sky
Alone and Undaunted
Catching the sun
Clouds are the sky's imagination.

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0 thoughts on “Moods And Moments

A heartwarming story, Piu. I would merely like to add a PS. I do not think that tree is going to turn crimson again. Not for anyone else. Unless that boy comes back.But that boy can’t come back. Because he would no longer be a boy. However – even within an adult the boy could sometimes continue to exist. Then perhaps, if you happen to pass by you might – you might see that crimson again.

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To us Ba was a simple housewife following Bapu’ in every decision he took . Ratnottama Sengupta’s article on Ba is not only well written but well researched too . The brilliant write up brings to light Ba as a person , her contributions in Bapu’s life and in the freedom movement.
Thanks Ratnottama for this interesting and informative write up.

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Recording Angel 😊
Thank you for the unique comments. Do take care and I wish KKR to win always … and in every match😀

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Debasis Sengupta

Highly researched by a competent writer. It brings out clearly the unacknowledged contribution of Ba in India’s freedom struggle.

Thank you Ratnottama for this write up.

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Well,here’s a new take on the Gita maxim, “karmaNyeva adhikaaraste!” How Peeyush would love this!

Don’t worry Piu if you are not in the team,your sixer has been duly noted by the Recording Angel, if not on the score board. A nice nostalgic contribution for the IPL season!

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I enjoy every bit of your appreciation and yet get confused. I fall in the trap of believing that I write great. But true works… the one that stays longer… and are profound…require more time and reflection .
I don’t do that!
They are bits of me … quick , random, sketchy. More like those roadside panipuri.
But sometimes… some nights…I read something amazing… something profound of other writer and a spell is casted!!

Thanks for your warm words and the time you spend in encouraging 🙏🏽

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How do you think of these things,Piu! I’m speechless. And to express it so sensitively too. I guess an artist is an artist irrespective of the medium. As for your initial query-You can stop wondering.
Every blessed thing in the universe has a thought and feeling.Haven’t I seen it demonstrated just now?

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Happy Nostalgia! Made my day. Thanks Piu! There are dancing girls and dancing girls, but this variety are the most adorable! That “khabe na?” says it all!

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An intensely emotional trip, Piu,- for the reader. And it relentlessly moves on to a throat-catching finish. But, as it happens in trips organized by Piu, about 2/3 way into it I felt the exactly opposite emotion and actually was reaching out to the phone to tell you how much I admired the deft switch!
All in all a not uneventful journey, by any standard!

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Great post and advice. Very useful information, it clarified things a lot for us. Thanks for the wonderful blog.

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However I am also able to augment the Wednesday schedule provided by your editor with this little contribution.In the Broadway hit comedy of Muriel Resnik,ANY WEDNESDAY, that is the day the heroine has earmarked for the weekly visit of her married lover!

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It appears the actual culprit is my haste.On reading the first part of the byline I got cheesed off and skipping the rest of it proceeded directly to the article.

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Thank you Bharatji! Your comments should be saved in a file and treasured!
But I would like to disagree with you regarding the byline😊
My editor friend actually got the essence in a line!!
Those were the days when we were still childlike and the raining jamuns could filled our hearts with glee. That age the prayers are true from the heart.

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This is one piece where the byline at the top (the work of the editor?) throws one totally off the track. Ignore the byline and read the vignette and it is total joy.

The best piece of writing is supposed to be where Nature and Art are in harmony. Here Nature Art and Artists (not forgetting the parrots) all merge into a homogenous emotional souffle. And the bit of audio (from the throat of Piu?) places the cherry unerringly on its top. Very satisfying!

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Thank you Bharatji 🙏🏽The little ones are imaginary and they never grew , still riding the train , I guess!!

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It is difficult to comment on this vignette, Piu. For, to do that, one has to separate some item out of it, good, or bad, like picking up things with a pin. This effusion is so homogenous, absorbing and peace-inducing that I can only say that I re-read it again immediately so that I don’t get back to mundane reality too soon. Both the boy and girl are people worth meeting. Are they still available, I wonder. 🙂

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Bharatji you are a constant encouragement and your comments add to my stories. Thank you and happy that we all are remembering and counting our blessings together🙏🏽

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Bravo Piu! I wonder if the picture he was drawing which made him miss his tea was ever as evocative as the one you have drawn of that hour in his class with the denizens of the garden (part of his family surely) come to attend his class as well! I too have my favourite teacher whom I would like to remember today- with love!

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Thank you so much Bharatji 🙏🏽
Indigo is a vibrant color and it casts a light which is his own. The suggestion is warmly taken.

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worth waiting for! How does one day matter if the fruit is so tasty. An atmospheric tale breathlessly told -and heard. I still haven’t got my breath back. Bravo Piu. the specialty words and phrases dot the stormy squelchy path like familiar guidelines.
The painting is beautiful but somehow appears too bright for a dark stormy night.

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Piu, I guess this is where the drawing teacher reveals her trade.I had aleady the benefit of a preview of the bits and pieces which have been here sucked in and seemlessly folded along with the Origami paper and right before one’s unbelieving eyes- voila! a boat ? a mountain ? or a funny looking cloud?

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Superb as ever Piu! Your mom was not the only one using the handi.

Sights and smells and thoughts being cooked together during the creation of this vignette. From past experience I keep my antenna tuned for “live” phrases and they are scattered all over- “weird wiring” for one! “Like the rest of her kind” for another! Actually the title itself was enough to draw me- I have two favourite songs one in Hindi and another in Bengali, from movies of that name. All I can say is- keep them coming!

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Dear Bharatji…I also look forward to your comments 🙏 I have few readers for my letters but I am very lucky that each one of them become a co passenger and we all take a ride together in the time machine. Stay well. I will keep posting letters.

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A delectable mixture of humor and seriousness! As I read along I stopped wondering why you chose that title! That was a classic move Piu.The second meaning keeps on recurring cunningly studded in the unlikeliest places! But that in noway takes away the eternal validity of the “Hard Truth” now so painfully underlined by Covid.

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Reena Dasgupta

The photographs by Manobina Roy beautifully captures an era long lost. How well she has chosen each subjects to depict the life and society of her time! An amazing collection by a woman much ahead of her time.

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Shashidhar. BR

Really great to read through the emotional issues with reality. Such writings really inspires the present generation to serve for the country

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I’ve fallen into the habit of not wanting to miss any of Piu’s blogs- no that word is too crassly journalistic for the slices of life soaked in emotion the lady brings out of her own magic lamp from time to time! And this is no exception. A short movie the way a movie should be shot. The constant movement in Time bringing together a full bodied roop katha is in itself a miracle. And you seem to do it so smoothly. Thanks for letting the Time stand still for a moment Piu. Do keep writing.

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I am so happy to see this post of yours. I lived in Jayanagar for 8 years and past two weeks I have been working on a write up about my Bengaluru experiences!! Such a coincidence to see urs . Good to see a fellow sojourner !! Very nice post !!

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Yes, Mr Bharat. That ‘old’ Bangalore, is cherished and remembered by all those who were a part of it. It is ironic that while the City itself has been renamed, all its charms and pleasures that really belonged to the erstwhile, unspoiled ‘Bengaluru’ have vanished.
Thank you for your nice comments. I completely echo what you have said.

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Thank you Mr Rajan. Your article was like a breath of fresh air which used be always present in my childhood but which is practically on its way out now. I belong to the other half of the spectrum – Basavanagudi in the City Area of Bangalore. With wide avenues lined with Gulmohar trees, large circles (a concept now totally obsolete) and practically no traffic, it seems more like a dream than reality now. We used to cycle to the Gandhinagar area for movies or the South Parade (now MG Road) for more movies, book shops eateries.
I don’t think traffic policemen existed in those days!

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Mr Swaroop.
Thanks a lot for your appreciative comment, embellished with your own pleasant memories of a lost Bangalore.

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I have been to Bangalore once that too just about 3 years ago. But this story appeals to everyone who loves to recall how his/her city used to be.

I have similar memories of Delhi, although I am Made in Delhi and will live my life here. The city has changed like any other, perhaps more rapidly because of metro, Commonwealth Games etc.

Raj, I agree with you. The story did bring a smile. 🙂

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The nostalgia trip of a more unhurried and a more innocent age brought a smile. Although my time in Bangalore was a few years during the turn of the century it remains second home in a sense. The walks and the eateries were always pleasant. The Saturday morning routine of my cousin and me was heading to a Darshini in Malleshwaram for breakfast and takeaways for people at home. That and other such little pleasures are kind of lost. Can see where Mr Rajan comes from on this.

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Mam you’re just infallible. You add perfection is your every written piece!👍🎀

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Really missing the carefree summer vacation at my maternal grandmother’s house at pune, we are a gang of 10 creating nuisance every time that become difficult for others to Handel us 😉
Reading this reminds me of those days…

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This piece resonates with all the emotions I felt before summer vacations. It’s lovely and refreshing. Especially the first para…I can remember the suspense I felt before that report card came into my mother’s hands.

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There is a scene in Rajnigandha wherein Deepa sits at the window watching the postman pass her house daily without once stepping in. I remember we used to do the same watch in our younger days. A single letter would be the equivalent of a jackpot then.Well, I have not received a single letter delivered by a postman (actually postwoman in our area) during the last decade, maybe much more.
Long before Corona email has turned the world upside down. Have you seen the latest M.O form? The space for message is hardly a pin stripe.
Sic transit gloria!

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Piu’s letters evoke long forgotten memories of childhood, boyhood and manhood and give no inkling about how to deal with them until they disappear on their own and leave you free.

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Wonderfully nostalgic and lovingly painted picture Piu! I belong to the times when those post cards where every tiny area was covered with writing and were eagerly awaited and breathlesly consumed.Oh for those forever lost days
Thanks!

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Marvelous blog. I really enjoyed reading this blog. Ladakh is one of my favorite travel destinations in India. It is a very amazing place. The vibes of here takes you to just another world. Thanks for sharing this information.

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I walk in the dusk knowing I’m lost
still I walk in hope, to find my destination someday
I know not what destination is
but I walk in hope, to find what I’m looking for
I know not what I’m looking for
but I walk in hope, that I’ll find you one day
I know not where are thou
yet I walk in hope
that you’ll find your path to reach me, hold me and never fade away

The path you are in was once waiting for you

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I walk in the dusk knowing I’m lost
still I walk in hope, to find my destination someday
I know not what destination is
but I walk in hope, to find what I’m looking for
I know not what I’m looking for
but I walk in hope, that I’ll find you one day
I know not where are thou
yet I walk in hope
that you’ll find your path to reach me, hold me and never fade away

The path you are in was once waiting for you

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Subhasis Gupta

Short and crisp yet with loads of information that was not known to us, aptly accompanied by record cover, recitation of Tagore and Ketaki’s English translation of 1400 Saal. Excellent power packed writing. In all of your writing, you bring in many unknown or little known facts and experiences with immense passion which makes us feel, breath and experience the time.

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Dear Dr. Rahman,

Nearly all biographical articles on Geeta Dutt do mention that her family belonged to (and even she was born in) the Faridpur district of undivided Bengal. Why should that have something to with her status as an artist? She is revered across the globe.

This article is based on the author’s personal memories of Geeta Dutt. The mention of where her family hailed from, perhaps wasn’t relevant here. The author didn’t live in Fairdpur. Neither did Geeta Dutt, during the times when the author saw her.

Please refer to the several articles we have on her right here in our magazine here – each one mentions her ancestral roots:

Geeta Dutt – The Skylark Who Sang From The Heart

Geeta Dutt – The Singer with the Golden Heart

Eternal Wait: The Story Of The Dark Girl By The Meghna (Geeta Dutt)

Hope you will enjoy these heartfelt tributes to Geeta ji. 😊🙏

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Some of points in your articles need correction. For instance, Ghalib prayed quite regularly.

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Radhika kapur

You have the art of virtually transporting the reader to the locale & it feels as though one is witnessing it … very enjoyable

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‘By a whisker’-takes you on high imaginative tangent and takes you on a roller coaster of unexpected turns.

The characters and their vain humanised motives are delightfully enacted, with a doze of modulated action,and sparkling humour.

There are many hidden links- in the character names, their behaviour, the language,very subtle and open ended, left to individual interpretation- the making of an enduring story.
Kudos to Ramendra, once again!

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The actual geet is composed by Maithili kavi “Vidyapati”…he must be recalled and praised for his beautiful composition…

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I am not aware if Amrita Pritam had penned her autobiography. But if there is one, then Ye Kahani Nahin has to be part of that necessarily. It characterizes her relationship with Sahir whom she refers as SA and herself as AA. This characterization is tethered to a rendezvous spanning three days – and is therefore objective even as it is full of symbolism.

As I grasped this literary piece on YouTube, I could easily discern that a pregnant silence connected the two, that an innate dignity informed their relationship, and that Sahir’s mother was in the picture wistfully looked at them, to their connect. AA did allude to the difficulties inherent in their relational consummation – that they were of different religions, that she was under the burden of an existing formal relationship. Yet they enjoyed a relational openness, did not keep this fact to only themselves.

Jumelia’s adaptation is beautifully word, is quasi abstract, compels one to visit the piece as originally penned. Jumelia’s prose is a threshold poetry. Will look forward to her further creative effort.

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Dr Mohammed Rahman ( Resident in UK , born in Bangladesh)

I have been living in the UK for many years, a Medical doctor by profession. I am a very keen music lover and try to sing in my friend’s circle now & then. Geeta Dutt has always been my favourite singer and often listen to her Bengali and Hindi songs. I am told by different people that her family was from Bangladesh but to my amazement I have never come across a mention anywhere that her family came from Bangladesh. Is it something you thought that it will dampen herstatus in the eyes of the rest of the people in Asian subcontinent. However , thank you .

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Debasish Bhattacharya

Dear Ms. Neha,

It is a reward to me when I see such a comment of appreciation from you. It took me down the memory lane four years back and found that it is as fresh as ever, watching the movie, listening to the songs and passionate scribbling my feelings out as an anecdote.

Thank you once again. Stay safe and happy within the four walls of your home in these hard times.

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Loved this detailed document about one of my most favourite songs. This song and the movie is so close to my heart and I’m amazed to witness how beautifully the song is used to portray a gay relationship where in the eyes of the society lord Krishna and Radha resembles as a heterosexual couple.
But this imitation shows love is love, it has no boundaries and no gender.

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Great sir! Congratulations for the successful and amazing end to this story. 🙂

Well, as a reader of the novel, it is a saddening news that it has come to an end. I used to wait every Wednesday and Friday. 🙂

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You have selected a very unique title for your post. I agree that gold jewellery is a woman’s, first love. You have also explained in detail which jewellery will go with which clothes and what kind of personality will the jewellery portray. I have heard about matching jewellery with clothes but this is the first time I am hearing about matching jewellery with your personality. Thank you for sharing this wonderful post with us.

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Congratulations! To Sagar and Hyderabad Blues for such a nice winning. May this novel get a very nice and happy ending!

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One of my very favorite Begum Akhtar ghazals. Somehow didn’t realize this was Shakeel!
Loved your connect with Sahir and the interpretation of this.
Will hear it more carefully now.
Vijay ji please likhte rahiye.

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Hat’s off to Aamir for getting the partnership hand of Shantanu. May god give him more capacity to do great things like these. I am sure that Aamir and Shantanu will make a great pair.

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Congratulations! To Aamir for being the partner of Shantanu for the debate competition. Great story sir. Waiting to see what happens next.

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You have a loving heart. You look for love and you get love. An amazing tender write, Santosh Bakaya. Congrats!

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Great! Great! Brilliant story!!!! I hope Sagar would get better and would be able to participate in the camp.

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Great suspense created by the author! I was waiting for this episode eagerly. And now I am waiting to know what happens next.

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Such a heartwarming story. The innocence of a child is somewhere lost in the run for adulthood.

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Wow! Great work done by the writer this story is very inspiring and I love the effort put in by a small kid

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Wow! Beautiful!

Great efforts by Ramen Uncle and Avijit Uncle!

Thanks to Sagar and Amir I have started getting interested in cricket which I never liked before.

I like Amir’s character very much!

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Very beautiful! Well, didn’t the author feel hungry while writing about these delicious, finger licking dishes?

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Wherever you set foot, Santosh ji, the fog would clear. Beautiful — both the writing and you.

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A wonderful write up, excellent narrative,the contrasting imagery in the opulent marriage scene and the rag picking children’s scene is brilliant. You are a keen observer and your write up comes laced with a pinch of salt.Lovely.

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Thank you so much, dear Rachel. Felt good reading your comment. I totally agree with everything you have mentioned. Really appreciate your heartfelt comment.

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I agree with Vinitha. I think the rise of realism has come from the field of digital art, just as the invention of photography gave rise to abstract art. I feel like we, as artists are constantly competing with the rise of technologies that allow those who normally would never be able to enter the arts… overtake us and we have to rise to the occasion by stepping into places that technology has not been able to go.

The last paragraph where she describes her passion and what happens when the paint hits the canvas. There is no truer statement. I think we, as artists – are that way, the paint and the relationship with the brush and understanding canvas and paper and paint…. its a soul relationship and opens the door to a realm where only that relationship exists. Time is meaningless and nothing and no one can enter until we step outside of that sphere.

Her work is emotional. The ballerina dancing on the ocean really touched me… that unknown, uncertainty of dancing on air…our emotion….never knowing when you will fly or when you will crash into the waves. Knowing this is the only thing your soul was put on earth to do…. but on some level it will drown you too. Really powerful

I also entered the corporate world and then quit to go back to art… so I totally get that. 🙂

Shes super talented… I hope she has an amazing career!

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The depth, the sensitivity and the theme taken together are just a humdinger of a literary gift.

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Satyananda Sarangi

As always, this made my day. You’re absolutely a magician in storytelling, ma’am.

Enjoyed this.

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Jyoti, you’ve got me wanting to start reading these authors right away, in their original language!
Very well presented. Please keep writing.

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Very well written. She exactly reflected our Telugu readers, movie goers feelings towards the two great Bengali writers

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This is a brilliant take on Sarat. He is my favorite too. I guess, I read all his stories while I was in 11th and 12th standards. Premchand I read while in 9th and 10th – volumes of Mansarovar.

Sarat wrote in a relatively narrow domain dominated by women. His women are not flawless but are remarkable. Gulabo of Pyaasa will easily pass for a Sarat’s woman. Sarat is very intense, almost lives his characters. He emotes, easily gets an empathising readership.

Premchand had no gender preference. Oftener characters in his stories appear subsumed in a larger socio-economic-cultural issues. He essentially witnessed his characters.
Shatranj ke Khiladi of Ray and Devdas of Bimal Roy evidence the difference in approach and style of the two great story-tellers.

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Beautiful! The lamb’s replacement with the pup can be inferred as substituting “service to God” (the lamb is often deemed as a symbol of Christ) with “service to mankind” (the pup is after all an ordinary creature reflecting the mundane). And this message is the need of the hour!

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Enjoyable read. A story full of sensitivity and emotions about love, nature and well-being of humanity and his environment. TFS, Santosh ji.

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Geethanjali Dilip

Every little detail in the countryside and urban India merging with the rural. Such unusual subjects although seemingly mundane in day to day life. Brilliant you are!

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It is a narrative of its own class. So immaculate but so sweet in words presentation that object describe becomes life like.

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Lovely write up! I shuddered when Kanchan made an entry but she came for a good cause and all’s well that ends well. Love your frowzy foursome alliteration.

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“Ordinary people with extraordinary missions make a quiet difference to this world, most of which remains unsung.” Brilliantly said. What a story this is. You’re so right. We all want reforms yet are hesitant to take steps towards it, especially if it means stepping out of our comfort zones. _()_ to that farmer and his mission. A huge thanks to you for this inspiring write-up.

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Love the idea of freedom of the elderly gentlemen in the narrative. You writing almost feels like taking a stroll, like we are a part of all that goes on around in your writing. The note if optimism and hope is never missed, a delightful read as always.

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Congratulations on the complition of your 50th meandering, Ma’am! It’s great to see the happy change in the air. And, you have made it so swift for your readers. This is what I would call “Effortless Revolution “.

Your Kanchan should rule every kitchen. ❤

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Deepak K. Choudhary (Darshak)

Another fascinating ‘meandering’! Ma’am, I love the way you observe life in its myriad subtleties and its multifaceted, kaleidoscopic earthiness. What I find even more engrossing is your style, your diction and parole. The tapestry of expression you weave is marked with an effortless ease and unruffled brilliance reflecting the depth of your understanding of the subject dealt with. This is something outstanding, so rarely noticeable among the contemporary writers of imaginative/fictional prose…🙂

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This is simply awesome, Sir. I learned many new things with this essay. Many, many thanks!

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This is so real. Its an every day problem. We wrinkle our noses, crib, complain, blame the government but continue to litter. Your MM today gives a super picture of the public apathy cloaked in your characteristic humour. Brilliant Santosh Di!

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Namaskaar Gajendra Jee. Bahhot sundar likha hei Aapne. Veisse to Rafi Sahab ke baareme jitna kahe, utna kumm hei. Aapne tto qamaal hee Kar diyaa. Shukriyaa for sharing.. Bharat Oza from Nasha group

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I dont about other things…but your writings always make me happy. Dictionary also gets happy to find itself of some use. The 😊

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Wonderful comment Kunal Da! Humbled at your feedback. Thank you so much 😊🙏”Geeta’s voice apart from being well-trained also carried a distinctive feminine quality.’ Absolutely! Also the Meera bhajans of Jogan, the way she has sung, to me none has sung them with so much devotion and bhaav. They are as if Meera herself is singing. I can understand the impact.

“It was most unfortunate that this golden voice remained unmined for major part of her singing career.” – yes, true that. The saddest loss for the music world.
Thanks again!

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Kunal Chatterjee

Must admire your expression supported every bit by painstaking research……a project by itself. Thanks Antara for sharing a few unheard melodies of Geeta Dutt.

My initiation into film music began sometime in 1949 on family pride HMV gramophone and Radio. That was an era when brand new crop of singers were emerging on the musical arena and therefore it holds a tremendous nostalgic appeal for me personally. Geeta’s voice apart from being well-trained also carried a distinctive feminine quality. The song which appealed to me the most at that tender age was “Ghunghat Ke Pat Khol, Tujhe Piya Milenge….” from Jogan.

It was most unfortunate that this golden voice remained unmined for major part of her singing career.

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Wow…what lovely canvas of rain you created in this piece.Your words are magical.In a flash the whole scene comes dancing in front of me.I soaked myself thoroughly too. How nice to be a child and soak again in the rain.Dil toh baccha hai ji…Soaked thoroughly, ecstatically…with my morning cuppa tea.

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Your words …your demeanor…your motherly smile are like jaldi ki jhappi for everyone around you. The old lady is not the only beneficiary. I can always feel it for myself.

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What a Surprise, I am reading Mehdi Hasan on this forum.

I still regret I couldn’t get ticket of his concert at Birla Hall Marine Lines when he visited India in 1976 which was sponsored by Philips. To my surprise when I went to book ticket a week before it was totally sold out. No tickets available 1000, 2000 etc. I didn’t know Mehdi Hasan that time. I never listened his songs or ghazals. I was stunned by his popularity.

We grew up listening songs which were easily heard everywhere on streets, restaurants so listening ghazals was very rare. Among my friends I was the only Urdu School product so no one was interested in Ghazals except some of my school friends. But we never listened private ghazals with that interest as we listened Bollywood songs or Ghazals.

My Stay in Gulf gave me chance to listen all kinds of music which include Ghazals. We knew Ahmed Faraz by Ghazal Ranjish hi sahi. When I went to Saudi Arabia I listened Mehdi Hasan and Ghulam Ali. Coincidentally I listened Parveen Shakir the great female poet in a Mushaira and then listened my fav Ghazal Ku ba Ku phail gayi baat shanasai ki by Mehdi Hasan. His way of ragas and aalap are just amazing.

Thank you for this superb post!

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LnC-Silhouette

Some comments received on this article on Facebook:

Naveen Anand: A very insightful article indeed. Bhooli Bisri Chand Ummeedein…A ghazal I stay obsessed with…

Suneela Verma: His ghazals are my daily doze of connect with myself… thank you for a very informative article.

Monica Kar: A beautiful tribute indeed. I learned a lot about this singing legend. Thank you, HQ Chowdhury dada! Especially those nuggets of how popular he was – among kings and robbers et al!

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Subhash Chandra

Sweet write about the sweet children who do not indulge in a wrangling discussion about why India lost the World Cup, but who blissfully play the game.

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Thank you for such lovely review Latha Rajgopal.

I am humbled and overwhelmed by your words. And am so glad you could relate to the whole journey. That means a lot to me, coming from someone who has actually taken the footway.

Your words inspire me and encourage me to write more. Thank you once again!

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Latha Rajgopal

Anantha
Aman n Sahil n little Adi were so well characterized I felt as if the incident is happening in front of me and the concern about the baby’s security by the main 2 characters was really appreciable! I could in fact feel travelling on the foot steps of Tirumala as I had once experienced the taking path of steps to Tirupati!

Thank you for giving such interesting episode look forward to many more!
Antara thank you for gifting me Anantha Alagappan!

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Antara Banerjee

A wonderful portrait of a mundane morning made special by your lovely observations… Small things that escape the common eye… catch your loving eye to naturally and follows from your pen like second nature that it is as good as witnessing the whole episode live….

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I have been a regular reader of Morning Meanderings and this one is my favourite till now. How beautifully the mundane and the regular is painted in hues and Hopes and heartiness.
The way only Santosh di can

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Ramendranath hi,
Hum bhagvan jagannath ke bhakt hain. Aap ki kitab Tales Of Jagannath available Nahin hai kripya available karaden aur apse vinati hai ki us kitab ko Hindi me anuvad karneki anumati den

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Ha ha. Superb. Everytime I will see a man donating his watery wealth on the streets, I will remember this story. My eyes would start searching for a monkey and a hose pipe.

The phrase watery wealth should reach the ears of some Bollywood director. Its hindi avatar will get quite famous.what would it be’Geeli Daulat’?

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Beautifully and touchingly woven story. Narrative flow is great, and the theme and musings on it is peerless. Myself is votary of the failed heroes, and this bird woman steals me!

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Santosh di
First thing a big round of applause for you. Never knew I will encounter a writer in You.
It’s after 1994 I have seen a glimpse of you. Thanks to Renu Di’s friend request.
Fantastic initiative. Look forward to some musings of a philosopher as well.

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Ashok Bhargava

Thoroughly enjoyed reading the detailed, analytical and in-depth interview of Ramakant Das. I am fortunate to have met him personally. He is a very personable and friendly person. He is a poet of high calibre.

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Ashok Bhargava

Amazing how a small incident could become a life long memory and innocence could be immortalized by the power of words. Your writing style dignifies poverty and bestows a sense of quiet strength to a child’s smile.

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Very well brought out. The boy-girl imbalance starts from the fetus and grows into disproportionate misogyny at the societal level. I have three daughters and never felt the need or absence of a son. Neither I say that they are as good since that would be admitting the fact that the son is the ‘chirag’ ! I always joke at home that the day I feel outnumbered with three daughters, one granddaughter, and one wife, I would rather go and pick up a male pup only for balancing out ! 😀

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Monalisa Joshi

This is a very heart warming story and I hope Raja is stil with you all grown up I guess by now <3

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This is so cute. Animals also have an art to take their share of love.From Chotu to Raja…a lovely piece to read in the morning.Bear hugs from Ranchi.

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Excellent!
Being a dog lover, must say this makes my day!! And you Ma’am, come across as kind hearted Annapoorna!
The irony of ‘Chhotu’ instantaneously making over to ‘Raja’, quite amusing!
It takes no time to develop a bond with animal and bird life around.
‘Hungry hai kya!’ made me drool over!
Hats off!

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Dr. Paromita Ojha

Such a trivial thing …we tend to overlook …. however you have described it so vividly Dr Bakaya…wonderful

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Thanks so much Taiyeb Shaikh ji for your little story… its making me feel very hungry for mangoes now. In Delhi we enjoy a variety – chausa, dassehri and langra mostly. My ancestral home is in Benaras – so the summer vacations went into gorging heavenly langras. No one can beat Banarasi langras in sweetness. They are khaas aam 😁

And my mom-in-law used to make out of this world mango shake spiked with kaju, kishmish and a small dash of ice-cream at times.

But I think the name “hapus” fits the aam perfectly – its the sound you make when eating the aam with its skin on….😁 I didn’t know aam (mango) is Urdu. Aamrapali got her name from one born under the mango tree.

Aam (common in Urdu) is well known to all of us here with Diwan-e-Aam and Diwan-e-Khaas of Red Fort 😀 Thank you for sharing the Urdu words.

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Taiyeb Shaikh

Superb Morning treat for Mango lovers like me.

From March to June we must eat Mangoes & that too only Alphonso which is popularly known as Hapus in Maharashtra. My mother used to make aamras & serve it with fresh pooris when we used to have too many mango boxes at home.

Growing up in Bombay or Mumbai has its fun.
Waise Aam (common) is عام in Urdu & Aam (Mango) is آم in Urdu. It’s easy to write in Urdu.

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I can’t reiterate enough how much I like your picturesque writings. The first few paragraphs are full of example of metaphors that I must show to my students. And then amidst it all you subtly put your point: child marriage! Wonderful writing as always.

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Unlike the common people Santosh Bakaya loves to come out of her home even on a rainy day and watch the vigour and vitality of the soaked feathered creatures, and the whelp, and the bipeds. She finds them all nourished and nurtured, exciting and passionate. Her keen eyes do not fail to notice how the neglected cars get a free doorstep car wash, how incorrigibles manage to empty their trash can in their neighbour’s backyard. Being an ardent birdwatcher and a dog lover she spontaneouly gets sprinkled by the love and attention of the fowl and the pup.

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Unlike common people, Santosh Bakaya loves to come out of her home even on a rainy day and watch the birds, canines and humans soaked and embraced in the world of their own fancy. Being an ardent birdwatcher and a dog lover she notices how the rains bring new vitality and drive into the kingdom of the feathered creatures and the whelp. Her keen eyes do not fail to notice how the neglected cars get a free car wash and how incorrigibles empty their trash cans in the neighbour’s yard.

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Monalisa Joshi

What a beautiful way to express the most mundane with complete surrealism. Enjoyed reading this morning meandering Ma’am…the narration was vivid and a fun read.

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Partha Sarathi Mukherjee

Why Santosh Madam is a celebrated story writer, has been answered in her following glimpses of the story above mentioned. Three simple slum dwelling characters but impulsive life n their the movements and how the writer has been decided to be greeted by a dissimulation of birds are full of pulsatios of life in her inking.
We are getting the prosaic surroundings have become thriving with life when scuffling of three birds, have agreed to approach the person for drops of water ,and how startling readers can see buyers in road side shop housed in shanity asking Patanjali product and how then characters become the example of simple life without any artificial simplicity how they represent a mockery of our so called deceptive courtesy ,full of heartless feelings . The writer has described feud and friendship altercation and amiability,but no brutas stabbing of our modern upper middle class family or society.Mock courtesy has been so nicely depicted that it looks sharper than Dattani’s ‘Bravely Fought the Queen”.

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Excellent!

The Media hype about the lives and concerns of the celebrities and those who are higher-up in the social ladder is understandable, and you have aptly highlighted the brazen apathy of all towards the daily concerns of the common folk.

Employing a needy girl as domestic help and listening to her in all patience us the hallmark of this excellent narrative

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Firdaus Parvez

Haha 😂 love the humour! I remember a milkman pestering me the same way when I stopped buying milk from him. He said I was lucky for him and please could I at least take only a little each day even 250 ml would do. He was persistent to such an extent that I was pulling my hair out and just short of kicking his butt.

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Simply hilarious! Love the imagery you create. Can witness the pot-bellied milkman with his flying can, running as fast as his over-burdened legs can carry him with the snarling bhains hot on his heels 🙂

Keep writing!! You rock!

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Mehak Gupta Grover

Yes. The hard reality today is this. We are more attracted towards the distinguished ones leaving aside the masses. Beautifully described.

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Sangeetha John

Madam
so happy that you launched L&C. Your writing always is simple but very beautiful. Thank you for L&C.

Thank you
Sangeetha John

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Sanjit Kumar

Sometimes it appears litterateurs don’t only show mirror to societies or do honest commentaries but their sharp uncanny penetration could excite optimism in dark and solve gruelling complexties to living simplicity_____❤️🎶🎶🎶❤️

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Fascinating!
The author has vividly described the fight of the migrant workers not only at the place of their work but also with the ambiance in which they are forced to live. How the rain-soaked wood consumes their energy in igniting the stove to ensure the cooking of their food. Yet they endure all the despair patiently and forge ahead with their daily grind.

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Absorbing!
The flip-flop between the two men, one fat and another emaciated, the description of an altercation over the stealing of a towel leading to utter debasemenr and chanting of invectives and in no time the change of narratives while gulping tea and laughing heartily!

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U Atreya Sarma

We should try to relate, in one positive way or the other, to everyone we come across in our daily lives and it makes the air and our hearts lighter… paving the way for a better humanity… of course, only when at least a part of our reflections can translate into a concrete gesture for the needy.

And with the increased presence and action-oriented responsiveness of the altruistic minded in the society, and lesser greed… there really need be no ad-hoc or dubious political palliatives. Empathy and cooperative action are the moral of your musings, as I see it, dear Dr Santosh Bakaya. Thanks for tagging me on FB about this piece.

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Providential! Getting freshened-up in the early dawn by watching the grind of the struggling labourers in the smoky-chulha. A fitting finale for the international workers’s day–celebrated as May Day! It’s no surprise that Dr. Bakaya wants to have a heart to heart talk with the underprivileged members of the society for whose upliftment she is eveready to stay in the vanguard.

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Beautiful….so tender…so warm…infused with a love for reading and a love for books!!! Being a bookaholic, I know that feeling all too well.
Loved your piece Santosh Ma’am. Keep writing

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Pathos and humour very well balanced to depict human behaviour towards the have-all’s and have-nots in our society. The story telling style of Santosh is unique… with Charles Lamb’s description for ears and with expressions like asinine recalcitrance… loved the piece

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Oh that was great! Love all of your details and witt! It all sprang to life off the screen as I read… so well done!

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Joseph S. Spence, Sr.

This is just an awesome piece. I love the intensity of the story as it moves along. I like the illustration as a story line, develops, moves uphill to a climax, then back down to normalcy. It became very interesting at that point. Visualizing the man and the dog as great buddies probably skipping along on their way to their destination after the bout is inspiring. Blessings!

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It reminds me legendary Assamese singer Bhupen Hazarika’s famous lines ‘Manush manusher jonney, jibon jiboner jonney’
Great. kudos dear author.

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Subhash Chandra

Deprived children’s love of books and reading is beautifully brought out. Written with empathy. A touching piece. Ending is impactful.

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Monalisa Joshi

Ahaa…such a sweet and heartwarming story. Yes it’s very true canines can be the best of pals of humans. No wonder their love is so pure and you have shown the same through your story. Loved reading it.

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Beautiful post as usual.
Great narration.
Future Sarojini Naidu!?
COMPLIMENTI. BEST wishes and Blessings

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Such a gaze. A beautiful write totally engrossing and as refreshing as a summer bloom.

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Hunger drives the poor and the rich, animals and humans; brought out well through real-life accounts, in this post.

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Nice story where the two could not meet each other. I know a similar actual incident where a young girl and a boy met by chance during a ride in a Taxi from Jaipur to Delhi. Well, they kept on meeting later and are now happily married.

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I would like to be a part of this group. Do you accept only articles in English or in Bengali too?

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Yes we all have as alert citizens have to take the onus to handle this rising issue and we can do it if we all really decide

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Yeah, actually its simple common sense and conscience . if each person follows some basic traffic rules 80 percent issues will melt away. we do it when we go abraod and follow them there because we are scared of penalty but why donot we do that in our own home?

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Good write. Be it traffic or pollution or population… they are all different shades of the same problem. Our booming economy (many will disagree) had handed a lot of disposable money to consumers who are now buying cars and upgrading very frequently. Car / two wheeler makers are going for the kill. Today we have global car model launches with simultaneous launch in India.

Most of the people don’t know how to drive cars, yet are on the roads. Licences are easily obtained by paying bribes. Learners are driving in the overtaking lanes. Total chaos. Unless every citizen contributes, with due support from law enforcement agencies, there’s no solution in sight.

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To add to the above issues, dedicated BRTS lanes are usurped by private/commercial vehicles. There is basic lack of intellect. We need a military code to conform to traffic rules. Humans unfortunately follow the path of least resistance. We try to take the easy way out whenever possible. A sense of discipline can be inculcated only with the use of strict action against the offenders.
Volume of traffic cops should be increased to man the signals with ease.
Cameras should cover the primary areas of violation to begin with and gradually, the entire city should be covered.
Ridiculous and exorbitant fines should be levied for even small offences. For example, lane cutting – 5000. driving and talking on the mobile – 15000. Drunk driving – no fine, only jail term.
Evidence of the offence should be captured by the camera/devices and not be verbal. The fines should be remitted directly in the government account.
Wrong side driving can be eliminated by installing one-way spikes or “tyre killers”

Mollycoddling and drilling sense into the thick heads of the populace isn’t gong to work. Once the fines drill a hole in their pockets, people will change. A small hike in fuel automatically drives people to make changes to their monthly budget.

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Ramen uncle I liked your story very much. I liked Anjali the most because she didn’t leave her nani alone as she knew that she had none to call her own other than her.

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Rabindranath Chakravorty

A beautifully articulated essay on the ever energetic chirping girl pining for home coming !

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Thanks Sachin! Glad you liked the comment. We need more people like you who treat a child not as a product but as a person.

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Very true! Most parents expect too much from tehir kids even if they themselves weren’t any great. Thank you for sharing this post and reminding more parents about the significance of respecting children for what exactly they are rather than what you want them to be. Keep sharing such posts!

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This is a beautiful post on my most fav poet of our time. I’m lucky to listen him live in private gatherings. Sahir means magician who mesmerises us with his classic poetry. I used to memorise his ghazals or poetry after listening to him live.

Although I’m a Urdu School product still I had to refer to the dictionary while reading his poetry. It’s an excellent write up by Jyoti Suravarjula ji.

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Sahir adopted his pen name after he heard Iqbal’s this couplet.
Is chaman mein honge paida bulbul-e-sheraaz bhi,
Sainkron sahir bhi honge saahib-e-eijaaz bhi!

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First Sahir means magician.
About Tajmahal by Sahir…. मज़हर-ए-उल्फत means ‘manifestation of love’… not tomb of love. He used the word Mazhar, not Mazaar. Being a fan of Sahir I am bringing these to your notice. Corrections if made will add value to your essay.

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LnC Silhouette Magazine

Some comments received on this poem on Facebook:

Pisharoty Chandran: Your mathematical musing is inspiring. The point is ‘Matter is neither created nor destroyed’. 1 million species get extinct daily. If at all they have souls, they get recycled into newer creations. Some will be in human form, that’s all.
സൃഷ്ടി – Stithi-Samhara. Brahma-Vishnu-Maheswara.
In the end all this is a myth, a virtual reality, suspended in Ananta, the serpent, Time, what we call as the span of our own existence on Earth.

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Beautiful. Completely relatable yet context intact. Putting new life to Kalidasa’s version

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Thank You Monica.
That’s truly us both,41 years ago.
Our lives are full of many such episodes.
We feel blessed that a Divine Power chooses us.

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Wow! Bimal ji, loved reading this hair-raising adventure. And it was real-life! Loved the part where your wife calmly said “we will adopt her”. Bless her and you! If only we had more people like you in the world. Stay blessed!

Antara, loved the pictures you dotted this adventure with! Lovely!

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But I have seen myself 2 songs from the film Bombay Racecourse on Doordarshans program, Chaya Geet in 1975.

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Rishabh Sharma

Thank you for the opportunity Sir. Will surely look to meet to someday again.

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Bengal’s film industry was as full of intense clashes of personalities, jealousies, intrigues and schemings as talent in those days; so much so that there had been several tiffs: for instance those between Uttam Kumar and Hemanta Mukhopadhyay, Uttam Kumar and Suchitra Sen; just to speak of the two most unfortunate. Both relationships were later patched up, probably chiefly at Uttam Kumar’s own initiative – for he went on to produce films for both, but did much damage to Bengal’s filmdom.

Bengalis have seldom excelled in teamwork! But maybe those failings are not unique to just Bengal: high-profile professions where you constantly are – and demand to be – under the spotlight tend to produce professional rivalries everywhere.

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Dear Mr. Pahwa

I was and am a big fan of late actor wrestler DARA SINGH

I will appreciate to get some information about his earlier films in 1950’s like SANGDIL, PEHLI JHALAK, BHAKTRAJ, JAGGA DAKU AND 1960’s EK THA ALIBABA, KING OF CARNIVAL, SHERDIL, TWO FILMS WHICH DARA SANG, ONE WITH SANJEEV KUMAR AS BADNAM FARISHTA, AND ANOTHER WITH RANDHAWA, HIMMAT E MARDAN

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Thank you for your generous comments Vijay Ji.

Yes, all of his stories have too many characters akin to Russian stories. Although, he is the Shakespeare of Hindi, but his stories overshadowed other Hindi writers such as Mahadevi Verma.

Kafan is definitely best story but Karmabhoomi is the best novel after Godaan. Sad that Doordarshan didn’t make a series on it, otherwise it would appeared like Ramesh Sippy’s Buniyad which too has numerous characters.

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confusedoldbong

Yes, part and parcel of long distance communication, especially in IT companies where what to say and how much you say matters much more than how you work. Sad, but the truth.
Btw, I often do talk on mute.

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Nice review.

I have read most of Premchand. To my mind, he was a fine novelist but an extra-ordinary story writer.

In his earlier novels he seemed to lack finesse. Also, his novels had too may characters, much like some of the Russian novels. A comparison of Premchand with Sharat will appear apt. Sharat operated in a narrow woman-centric domain but was exceptionally impactful.

Premchand operated on a larger canvas and his concerns were largely societal than individual. Thus his novels did not emote as much as Sharat’s. But Premchand the story writer still has no peer – Tagore included – in any of the indian languages. The moment he shrunk the theme sweep – necessary for a story – he just became a world beater.

His best story, in my view is Kafan.

Ray woke up to Premchand little late. Yet he created a masterpiece – Shatraj ke Khilari. Sadgati was equally great but it was a short film.

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Thank you so much for your kind words sir.
I stand corrected on the couplet. Have requested Antara to correct the mistake and she has quickly responded and done.
I agree with your thought on his theory of religion. I feel an atheist is not always non religious but can be ‘practically religious’.
Also very true that one can read his work again and again and learn or discover something new every time.
Thank you once again._()_

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Thank you Antara for your kind words.
Also thank you for sharing the K.L.Saigal sung ghazal and the interesting info about it.
Thanks

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Peeyush Sharma

Thanks Antara for adding the KL Saigal piece. Saigal was probably among first to popularize ghazals among common music lovers.
Each of his ghazals are fabulous.

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Peeyush Sharma

Well written Niraj ji.
Ghalib Is evergreen, for all times.

He was simply put, gifted. He suffered all his life in pains of all various kinds only to be revered after his demise. His thought, language, concept, structure of his couplets and their reach is unparalleled. None prior to him and no one after have achieved it in reference to Urdu poetry.

He may have been satirical but his understanding of religions and their theory was unique and complete. How else could he in one line state; Na thha kuchh to Khuda thha, na hota kuchh to Khuda hota, as if stating straight out of the 10th Chapter, Naasadiya Sukta of Rig Veda. Or as if in the very words of Lord Krishna; Baazichaye atfaal hai duniya mere aage, hota hai shab-o-roz tamasha mere aagye. His thought process was gifted and highly philosophical.

One can read him every day and realize something unique.

Kehte hain ki Ghalibn ka hai andaaze bayan aur… Thanks Niraj ji.

One point though; in the penultimate couplet you have used above, it should be “GO” haath mein jumbish nahin (implicating, even though) .
Best wishes on your book.

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An excellent essay… opens new vistas of understanding Ghalib!
Each ghazal discussed has been painstakingly translated to help us readers understand the difficult Urdu words… a special thanks for that!

The handpicked collection of ghazal videos is top order too… we’ve grown up on them!

I am reminded of a personal favourite by KL Saigal ‘Main unhen chhedoon aur kuchh na kahen‘ – composed by the legendary singer himself.
I am told he repeats the first line 3 times in the original 78 rpm while in this YouTube video we hear it twice. A unique experimentation but then with Ghalib you got to have excellence in every note.

Thank you Niraj Shah for this poetic trip through Ghalib’s gems!

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Thank you Manekji _()_ for your valuable suggestions.
One ghazal each of Talat Saab and Begum Akhtar have been added. The essay is more enhanced now 🙂

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Manek Premchand

Very well written, on the greatest Indian poet of them all! Just wish instead of two songs by Jagjit and two by Suraiya, if there had been at least one by Talat – the king of ghazal singing – from Mirza Ghalib the film. And perhaps one from Begum Akhtar or Rafi. Just my thoughts, but otherwise a nice essay 🙂

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Thoroughly enjoyed your article on Jagjit Chitra. My ride for work was made enjoyable😊
Can relate with many thoughts.

Superb article.

Just to add a few things:
He used digital recording and modern instruments to attract more youth towards ghazals. Beyond time was first digitally recorded album in 1987.
His live concerts were mix of ‘gayaki‘ and also gimmicks to entertain every type of audience.
For purists he also came out with a pure classical based album in 2000 named different strokes.
His Bhairavi’s were very popular in his live concerts.

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Hi Srobona,

Wonder that you’ve written such a wonderful story and also with a moral attached to it . You are truly stepping into your mother’s shoes…..
May God bless you.

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Thanks so very much Kunal! Its an impossible task to encapsulate such a Himalayan repertoire in a few words so no one would try that or succeed. My attempt was to try and provide a glimpse into the universality of his work that connects with every human being, irrespective of language, race or creed.
So very glad you liked it. Feeling enriched and humbled with your feedback.
Thanks!

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Main Apni Favourite Hoon..says the dreamy eyed Kareena Kapoor in Jab We Met and Indian girl wasn’t the same again.

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Though incomplete and only an excerpt, its a treat to the readers…….

Kudos dear Lopa……
Will be waiting eagerly for your upcoming collection…….

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Outstanding Work Antara. The research, the granular details of Gurudev’s work and the explanation is a literary tour for people like me who dont know so much about him. This article is worthy for a personal collection. Thanks so much.

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Carbon fiber is very good material and gain more popularity nowadays. They are best material for shock absorption which makes it good bang for bucks for those who are little bit careless with device and gets their phone damaged easily.

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nice meterial of i phone case we are also deal with the online mobile phone shopping in ksa if any one intrested to buy online product in middle east and saudia or discount rate please may visit our site eshtari.me

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Her alcohol laced voice is like a whiplash on celluloid. Sahib Biwi Aur Ghulam haunts us even 54 years later.

Like the doomed love story of ‘Chhoti Bahu’ in Sahib Biwi…Both Meena and Geeta (Dutt) became alcoholics and finally both succumbed to cirrhosis of the liver very early in life.

Somewhere her script went haywire… her life went haywire.

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Learning and Creativity Magazine

Thank you Maria,

Glad to know this lovely essay by Rounak helped you!

Wish you all the best for your speech. Do well 🙂

Best wishes,
Antara
Editor, Learning and Creativity

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Sudarshan Talwar

More details I have about Jhankar when it was launched who was director music, lyrics, writer, etc.

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Thank you Sriram for the generous appreciation of our magazines – Learning and Creativity and Silhouette.

You have nicely summed up the objective behind our articles – we are trying to curate our rich legacy with as much accurate information and insights as we can gather. There are opinions expressed of course but biases are carefully kept away.

About Sanjeev Kumar – you are absolutely right. In fact, I republished this article in Silhouette with a few more insights.
https://learningandcreativity.com/silhouette/sanjeev-kumar/
He was a towering actor among the melee of heroes – his range of histrionics and his ability to slip into the character in a way so as to keep the “Sanjeev Kumar” away was remarkable. He spoke with his eyes – a 1000 words more than any dialogue can convey.

Thank you for your kind comments. I have read all your comments on our other posts too and embedded the videos you have suggested. It will help our other readers enjoy your suggested songs other than our authors who are enjoying your informed feedback.

Please do keep sharing your insights.

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Geeta Dutt was the most original singer and a one of the very few singers who sang from core of her heart.
She had a heart of gold comes as no surprise. Unfortunately, she worked in a volatile and opportunistic Industry which let her down.
What she could not earn in life, she earned afterwards.
She is still one of the most popular and revered singers with a large number of fan following.
Her voice carries her golden heart.

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This website contains unbiased quality articles about film personalities and true heroes are recognized.

People hail Amitabh and Dilip Kumar as greatest actors but to me they were good star with great screen persona and good acting abilities. Sanjeev kumar was actor among stars. There is no comparison. It is a shame that his prowess has not been recognized to the extent it should.

Keep with with your good work.

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Janite cheyechho tumi, bhuleo kokhono mane pade ki tomay;
Ektoo Chaoya aar ektoo paoya, tai niye gaan gaoya sarabela;

I have heard these memorable songs from my childhood without knowing the name of singer but thought that whoever be the singer, she is the great human with all qualities by the God.

Today I know, she is Great Evergreen Singer Geeta Dutt. I go through Geeta Dutt’s life! A beautiful flower nipped in bud! Alas, what right did this man have to shatter her dreams and life. We have never seen her but her songs and style of singing a song explains her internal potentiality & talent and how she was as a human. That is why, God has taken her back to Him for her mental peace because she was not fit for this cruel world.

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If you list out the 10 best Hindi films of all time, Amar Prem would be in the list. Superstar Rajesh Khanna looked his handsomest best in this movie & his performance was simply superb, though the movie revolved around Sharmila Tagore who too gave a heart warming performance.

R.D Burman is at his musical best, along with extraordinary lyrics by Anand Bakshi & exceptional direction by Shakti Samanta makes this film an absolute classic..

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This is such a heartwarming poem… As a mother I know how difficult it is to make kids listen to you and the most difficult job is to make them wear a sweater or socks or shoes or a cap.
And then when they catch cold, they quip – thandd lag gayi kyunki socks nahin pehne thhe na. (so much knowledge!!!! 😀 )

Loved this poem.. touching, affectionate and beautiful

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Shabir Ahmad Mir

Such a subtle piece… The delightful narrative seamlessly underlines the masterful psychological underpinnings of a mother daughter role reversal… From being a love giver to a love seeker… It is simply brilliant

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The intimacy of this poem lends it such a tenderness that it makes u wish to be there at the end of poem to smile and treasure a moment of exquisite emotion forever. Thank you Ma’am for such a poem.

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An early morning treat…. So intimately beautiful… Thank you Santosh Ma’am for making my day.

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Shubhangi Shreya

It is good to add profits in Business. But it is better to give priority to Humankind and think for society welfare.

In this story, I can say that Ms. Joy Dey understands the true meaning and way to do Business. It was important for her to have customers in the restaurant, but she also thought about homeless beggars outside too. In my view, she is a very strong person who can clearly understand – The Needs Of Society along with The Goals Of Business.

It is a very beautiful story with a Moral Value attached to it. I think, the Author is a Creative Genius.

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It was very nice it was nicely written by yourself that what your mind though it very very good and you write all the line so so nicely keep it up you will become a huge person

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Sundeep,
I am so happy for you that you were able to make this wondrous journey and trace so much material on these films produced by your illustrious family! If you ever lay your hands on the prints, I would love to be there for a screening.
Naveen

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कहाँ से ढूंढ के लाऊँ, जावाब-ए-रफी?
तू आज भी लाजवाब है, ए मोहम्मद रफी।
$.$.?

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Advocate Pinki Chakraborty

I sumhw inherited d passion on theatres 4m my father & thus, watching a theatre 4 me, is alwys more satisfactory than watching a cinema.I knw Manas from my vry childhood.from d plygrund 2 d first cycle ride,from d 1st dy of schol 2 d tuition classes..as per i knw my bst frnd,he is nothng widout theatre..it’s in his vain n hrt..its giv me an immense opportunities 2 indulge myslf into sum of d bst wrks pr4med by them like “phera”,”nakshi kanthar math” & mny mr.i wish him & keshab al d bst 4 their bright future & also thnx amitava sir 4 creatng such a marvelous platfrm 4 these jwels..

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Yes,indeed he was the best. I find him the most versatile among his contemporaries.

As for dances, he had used his acting skills, one can see the song manchali kahan chali and many others where acted so superbly that keep on watching the videos and never get bored.

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Im using this as a reference for an honors humanities project, shout out to any mchs kids who are also here

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Priya Ji,

Thanks a lot for your appreciation! Means a lot to me! Greatly humbled…

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LAKSHMI PRIYA

Dear Sounak,

This article is P.hd material, not even P.G level . So vast and extensively researched along with the relevant videos.
Hope this finds its way into a rich and glossy coffee table book.

God bless u in all such endeavours of yours.

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Its really engrossing… Your story is really very thoughtful…. It’s. One of a kind.

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